Posts Tagged ‘kristy serkedakis’

3 Reasons the Holiday Season Is A Great Time To Sell!

November 24, 2014

home_selling_holidaysAs the holiday season nears, many homeowners who are contemplating selling think the holiday season isn’t a good time to sell their house. Because of that misconception, many will wait until after the start of the New Year, or even until spring to put their house on the market.

Contrary to what many think, the holiday season is a great time to sell a house! Putting a house on the market over the holidays can result in a seller getting a higher price and a quicker sale.

How can that be you ask? Here are three great reasons:

  • Buyers will have fewer homes to consider because competing inventory will be at its lowest level over the holidays.
  • Although there are fewer buyers looking at homes over the holidays, those that do are serious and highly motivated.
  • Homes that are tastefully decorated for the holidays show well.

So if you’re thinking about selling and planned to wait until after the holidays, you should consider going ahead now. The first step is to consult a real estate professional who is a local expert in your area.

Happy Holidays… and Happy Selling!

It’s Time for a Price Adjustment

September 8, 2014

home_pricingThe story is all too common. During your initial listing appointment, you agreed on a price with your sellers. You’ve worked tirelessly with that listing for several weeks (or months), had plenty of showings, put in the research, and you’ve found there’s only one problem: The price is too high. Your clients have already explained to you that they “need to get this amount out of the sale”, and you know that bringing up a price drop will probably cause some friction if not an outright “No!”

Before you start stressing out, remember that a price reduction in is in their best interest and you have a professional obligation to tell them what they need to do to get them home sold. With proper preparation and solid tactics, you’ll not only get the property priced to sell, but you’ll also gain lifelong clients that will truly appreciate you.

Here are 5 ways to properly handle a price drop:

  1. Set the stage: When you take the listing, tell the Seller that although you are comfortable with the price they have selected, the market constantly changes and it’s your job to monitor the market activity and let them know about any changes that affect the sale of their property. Explain that some changes could make it necessary for them to re-evaluate their pricing strategy.
  2. Stay in touch: Before you can even start suggesting a change in price, your clients need to be able to trust you and see you as a professional. The best way to accomplish this is by having regular contact with your clients, even when there’s nothing to actually report on the listing. I suggest calling them at least once a week to give them an update on their home. If you constantly keep them up-to-date with the latest developments, there’s a much better chance that they’ll understand the reasoning behind the needed price reduction. While they may be disappointed, they’ll know that you’ve been working hard and that this is the best option.
  3. Have an in-person meeting: The last thing you want to do is upset your clients, and there is a much higher probability of them being upset if you simply call, email or text them that they need to drop the price. Plan a get together at their home, a local coffee shop or your office. Face to face meetings are always more effective.
  4. Be prepared: Do your research. Be prepared to discuss the state of the market, recent transactions in the area, showings and feedback on their property. Properly presented, it should be clear why you are recommending a change in the pricing strategy.
  5. It’s a “price adjustment”, not a “price reduction”: A surefire way to upset your sellers is to bring a negative attitude and connotation to the pricing discussion. Instead, you should keep positive and upbeat about the situation, and concentrate on the fact that this will help them sell their home and move on to the next phase in their life. Also, using the word “adjustment” instead of “reduction” is a more neutral term.
  6. Listen and respond: Your clients will definitely have questions during the meeting, and if you aren’t listening to the true meaning behind each question, there’s a good chance you could end with an unhappy client and continue to have an overpriced listing. Listen carefully and be sure to respond to any objections you may hear, but don’t be defensive. Be understanding and mindful, and you’ll end up with happy clients.

What are your tips for price adjustments? Please comment below!

Objections are a Gift!

June 30, 2014

handling_objectionsMost real estate agents hope that their prospects won’t raise any objections. Instead, they should welcome them and see them as a gift! Anytime a prospect raises an objection, it provides an opportunity for the agent to earn their business.

Objections are a good sign because few prospects will bother to throw out an objection if they’re not interested in proceeding. When someone raises an objection, it simply means they have a concern and want or need to know more.

Depending upon the nature of the objection, objections can be dealt with in several different ways: (more…)

5 Tips for Converting Internet Leads

June 2, 2014

converting_internet_leadsDid you know that more than 90% of buyers start their search on the internet? It’s more likely than ever for a buyer to contact you through the web, whether it’s from one of your listings or via your website.

So you’ve checked your email, and you have a shiny new message from an interested buyer. What do you do now? Preferably, you’re the one and only sales professional that they’ve contacted, but you know that’s not true. When that lead comes in, you need to bring your “A” game to ensure that you end up being their agent!

Are you ready for some great tips for converting internet leads? Let’s get down to it! (more…)

It’s a Process, Not an Event! Part 3

March 3, 2014

leads_to_salesIn a previous blog, we reviewed setting SMART goals. After setting your goals, you’re ready for the final step in the process: Writing a Business Plan and schedule that support the accomplishment of your goals.

Before launching into writing your plan, determine how many days/weeks you will work this year. It’s helpful to use a big planning calendar, ideally one that shows all 12 months at a glance. Mark off vacations, holidays, days off and other commitments. Be honest. Factor in some time for unexpected events such as illness. Most real estate agents truly work about 42 weeks a year.

Once you’ve determined the number of weeks you will work, you’re ready to complete the Business Plan steps: (more…)

It’s a Process, Not An Event! Part 2

February 3, 2014

smart_goals

In a previous blog, the steps to be taken in advance of preparing your 2014 goals and business plan were discussed. To review, the steps are:

  • Analyze your 2013 business
  • Complete a skills evaluation
  • Document your time for one (1) week

After completing those three steps, you’re ready to establish goals and write a business plan.

Establishing business goals is just one piece of a larger puzzle. Business goals must fit with the other areas of your life: Personal, financial, family and spiritual. So, as you set your business goals, make sure they are not in conflict with goals in other areas. For example, if your business goals require a larger investment of time and your family goals are to spend more time with your family…. there’s a conflict. (more…)

Business Planning: It’s a Process, Not an Event!

December 23, 2013

2014_business_planningAs 2013 is winding down, most real estate agents are thinking ahead to next year, but many have not established 2014 goals and a business plan to achieve them. Investing the time to set goals and write a business plan pays off. Consider the fact that various studies show that people who have written goals and business plans earn, on average, 10X as much income as those who do not. So, it’s your choice: Plan to get what you like… or plan to like what you get.

Many real estate agents avoid setting goals and writing business plans because they don’t know where to start. First, it’s important to understand that goal setting and writing a business plan is the end product of multiple steps. It’s a process, not an event! (more…)

15 Reasons to be Thankful for Metro Brokers!

November 25, 2013

happy_thanksgivingAs we approach the Thanksgiving holiday, many of us are taking time to reflect upon the people and things for which we are thankful. Those of us in the real estate industry are thankful that the real estate market is in recovery and 2014 looks bright.

Agents with BHGRE Metro Brokers have many more reasons to be thankful… here are just a few: (more…)

It’s a Great Time to be in Real Estate Sales

September 30, 2013

join_real_estateUntil recently, all you heard about the real estate market was bad news. Prices dropping, over supply of inventory, excess bank foreclosures, short sales, etc. Income fell by 35 percent for real estate agents on average. Times were tough. Since the peak of the market in July 2007, thousands of real estate agents left the business and the interest in getting into real estate died.

That trend is reversing. It’s actually a great time to be in real estate sales. Home prices have increased month over month for the last 8 months, interest rates are still at historic lows, buyer demand is strong, bank foreclosures and short sales are down dramatically (35% of overall sales compared to 65% just 2 years ago) and new home inventory is on the rise. (more…)

Changing Companies in a Changing Market… Not Necessarily a Good Strategy

July 29, 2013

changing_companiesAs the real estate market is heating up, real estate agents are trying to figure out how to capitalize on the opportunities in today’s market. For some, moving to another real estate company may seem like the answer.

The reality is that changing companies in a changing market may not be a good strategy if a real estate agent is currently affiliated with a known and respected real estate brand. Such a move would likely hurt an agent’s business. (more…)